Thursday, October 22, 2009

Hua Hu Ching - Verse 25

Verse Twenty-Five
Not all spiritual paths lead to the Harmonious Oneness. Indeed, most are detours and distractions, nothing more. Why not trust the plainness and simplicity of the Integral Way? Living with unconditional sincerity, eradicating all duality, celebrating the equality of things, your every moment will be in truth.
~ Translated by Brian Walker ~
One aspect of Taoism that seems to befuddle the western mind is the idea that each being must find its own path. For a lot of people, this sounds like a subversive concept. If there are no strict external standards, then anyone can choose any path and it should receive the Taoist seal of approval!

Unfortunately, such a formulation is too simplistic. While it is true that each of us must forge our path independently, this does not mean that every path will lead to the same source. Many paths lead away from Tao and toward nothing more than self-imposed stress and imbalance.

So, while no one else can tell us which path to take, the great Taoist sages CAN point at some of the lamp posts along the route. If we get right down to it, that's what these classic works and today's contemporary contemplations are all about -- helping each of us to identify the variables that we need to work into our own individual itineraries.

This post is part of a "miniseries". For an introduction, go here.

4 comments:

  1. yes. i admire anyone who's put thought into their beliefs, and doubted their own faith in order to establish the right path for them.

    in my life i try to remove all self delusion from my beliefs... a HARD thing to do! how do i know whether i believe something because i find truth in it, or because i WANT it to be true? it's something i think no human can fully achieve.

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  2. Beautifully said! This strikes a perfect balance between those who demand their way is the only way, and those who free float thinking that all paths are equally helpful.

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  3. One of the things I appreciate about your 'ramblings' is that they avoid making these 'simplistic formulations' :)

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  4. This reminded me 'Siddharta' by H. Hesse. Nice book.

    We need to try our doubts, go downhill and then again to the sky, try what we delusionally believe what's best. We need to go to each path in order to comprehend eventually... that Tao is the path. Otherwise is practically imposible to guess.

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